Agriculture Classes

The Sauk Prairie Agricultural Education Department offers a wide variety of courses for students in grades 8-12.  Our department is one that encourages interactive hands-on learning for all students.  In order to maintain the success of our program, we must strengthen all aspects of instruction. A quality agriculture education program is comprised of three parts.  The three parts are: Classroom/Laboratory Instruction, FFA, and Supervised Agriculture Experience (SAE).

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Soil

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade Level: 9-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended Course: None

This course is designed to serve as a foundation course for classes in the Agriculture and Natural Resources Department. As a foundation course, students will focus on the diversity of the agriculture industry as well as looking at the biological makeup of plants and animals. Students will get experience working with live animals (rabbits, guinea pigs, chickens, pigs, and much more) in the animal laboratory. Students will also have the opportunity to explore other aspects of the agriculture and natural resource industry such as forestry, wildlife management, and agriculture careers.

Classroom Links:

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade level: 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended Course: None

During this semester course the class will explore selection of animals, feeding, reproduction, animal health, and behavior of specific animal species. Domestic animals we will be covering include: horses, dogs, cats, rabbits, and two species determined by students.

Lab activities include: animal selection with live animals, anatomy identification, small animal health care analysis, and handling / showing animal, a field trip to Aunt Bees Pet Spa, and a field trip to a local small animal veterinary clinic.

Classroom Links

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade level: 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended Course: None

This course involves an overview of the anatomy, genetics, nutrition, health, management and selection of various large animals that are raised for food purposes (Beef, sheep, poultry, and swine). Studies will also include meat science, breed identification, animal selection, and facility management. Students will learn the science behind the animal’s body systems through various weekly hands-on laboratory activities. The second portion of the class will focus on the growth and maintenance of various crop sciences. Planning of an 18 acre test plot will be included in this class.

Lab activities include: animal selection, meat identification, animal carcass evaluation, maintenance of production animals in the improved animal laboratory, formulating a feed ration, animal health research. A field study will also be included in this course and will involve a visit to Wyttenbach’s Meat Market, the USDA Dairy Forage Research Center, and a stop at a local swine farm.

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade level: 11-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended Course: None

This course teaches basic concepts of animal health. As a part of this course, we will be exploring the veterinary practices used in the industry for both small and large animal and will have the opportunity to work with veterinarians from the Sauk Prairie area during the lab activities.

Lab activities include: animal physicals with live animals, animal restraint, developing animal feeds, calculating medication dosages, conducting routine veterinary screenings, administering injections, conducting blood draws, and a field trip to Madison College’s Veterinary Technician program.

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade Level: 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended Course: None

Management of our natural resources is a non-traditional agriculture class that looks at how we manage our environment. Areas to be investigated include: water management, history of conservation, soils, wildlife survey, outdoor recreation, Wisconsin forests, exploring with maps, compasses and GPS (Global Position System), and the use of our energy resources.

Lab activities include: water sampling, soil evaluation, tree identification, tree pruning, chainsaw safety, using a compass, G.P.S. navigation, geocaching, and a field Trip to the Sauk County Forest.

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade level: 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended Course: None

Owning and operating fish hatcheries and related businesses are some of agriculture’s fastest growing sectors. Units in this course include: careers, community awareness, Wisconsin lakes and streams, aquatic plants, fish health, hydroponics, fishing regulations, water testing and exploration of different aquaculture systems.

Lab activities include: managing a 350 gallon fish tank with live freshwater fish, fish taxidermy, water testing, fish identification, fish dissection, fly tying, lure making, and a visit from a UW-Extension Fish & Aquaculture Specialist. A field study will also be included with this course out at Devil’s Lake State Park focusing on water testing, boater’s safety, and even some fishing.

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade level: 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended Course: None

This course will look at the various aspects of wildlife species in Wisconsin and how we can manage these precious resources. Units that will be investigated include: careers, large game species, wildlife identification, hunting, trapping, DNR game laws, taxidermy, game birds, waterfowl small game species, and endangered species.

Lab activities include: taxidermy, antler scoring, track identification, habitat construction, animal hide identification, safe hunting practices, wildlife identification, duck decoy painting, a visit with a DNR Game Warden, and a potential field trip to Poynette DNR field station.

*Pending BOE and DPI approval in Spring of 2019, this course may meet High School Graduation requirements for Science in 2019-2020.

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade Level: 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended course: None

This course provides a broad introduction to the biotechnology industry, including applications in diverse areas such as health care, agriculture, environmental science, and identification (including forensics) Ethical, Legal, and Social Issues raised by applications in biotechnology will also be discussed. Lab Activities include: podcasting, online discussions, gel electrophoresis lab, tissue culture propagation, DNA Extraction, and studying genetics using live plants and animals. Successful completion of this course will have the potential to provide students with two credits from Madison College (Biotechnology Applications, Biotechnology Seminar).

*Pending BOE and DPI approval in Spring of 2019, this course may meet High School Graduation requirements for Science in 2019-2020.

Students may receive dual credit at Madison College and SPHS upon satisfactory completion of this course.

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade Level: 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Students will be exploring horticulture and agronomy concepts such as plant reproduction, plant growth responses, and crop management. As a part of this class, students will be investigating and implementing protocols for setting up a crop operation (both in a greenhouse and in a crop field). This class will then research crop varieties, establish planting timelines, and implementing Integrated Pest Management protocols.

Lab activities include: setting up a greenhouse, transplanting plugs, evaluating plant health, identifying plant pests, monitoring plant nutrition, plant propagation, planning and implementing a 5 acre crop test plot, and plant identification.

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade Level: 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended Course: None

Students will be exploring expanding horticulture concepts such as plant reproduction, plant growth responses, and planting designs. As a part of this class, students will be setting up a greenhouse business through the establishment of a management staff. This class will then market their products to the community.

Lab activities include: setting up managing a greenhouse, transplanting plugs implementing plant propagation methods, evaluating plant health, identifying plant pests, monitoring plant nutrition, plant propagation, designing planting baskets, plant identification, pruning, lawn and turf management, greenhouse operation and an introduction to landscaping.

Classroom Links:

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade level: 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended Course: None

Golf courses and landscapes are two aspects of the agriculture industry that have a lot in common. This class will explore landscape design from the design on the paper to putting the plants in the ground as well as implementing these concepts on a 9 hole golf course.

Lab activities include: designing a 9 hole golf course, researching aspects of a country club (clubhouse, irrigation systems, turf grasses, etc.), measuring a landscape, drawing landscape plans to scale, install a landscape, identify landscape plants, and enjoying the great outdoors by serving as the Sauk Prairie High School’s official landscapers.

Classroom Links:

University of Minnesota Extension – Landscape Design

Length: 1 Trimester

Grade Level: 10-12

Credit: 0.5

Recommended Course: None

With a hands-on, activity-based approach, this class will challenge students to find the leader within in order to make them competitive in today’s society. Working independently and as a team member, this course is designed to educate the student on premier leadership, personal growth and career success. Skills in the areas of communication, goal setting, time management, financial planning, and job interviews will be taught. Students will also have an opportunity to explore their personality traits, improve their written communication skills, utilize various computer programs, and create and market a Wisconsin product.

Length: 1 Tri, 2 Tris, or 3 Tris

Grade Level: 11-12

Credit: 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5

Recommended Course: Concurrent enrollment in any Agriculture & Natural Resource class.

This work based learning experience is an on-the-job training program. With the help of the instructor, students are responsible for obtaining a work site that corresponds with the offerings through the Agriculture & Natural Resources Department. Students in this course will be responsible for completing weekly reports, following a training agreement, and completing employability assignments. Quarterly evaluations are provided by the employers to help students improve their work skills.